Best of the Week
of Oct. 24, 2004

Best of Week ArchivesArchives

Here are the most intriguing cross-cultural exchanges either begun or advanced during the week of Oct. 24, 2004, as selected by Y? These postings, as well as "Best of the Week" entries from previous weeks, also can be found by accessing Y?'s database using the search form , or, in the case of posted before April 24, 1999, in the Original Archives (all questions from the Original Archives have been entered into the database as well). In the Original Archives, as well as in the database, you will find questions that have received answers, as well as questions still awaiting responses. You are encouraged to answer any questions relevant to your demographic background, as well as to ask any provocative question you desire. Answers posted are not necessarily meant to represent the views of an entire demographic group, but can provide a window into the insights of an individual from that group.

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Question:

When an Islamic man marries, it is my understanding that there are civil and religious contracts. A friend of mine who is Islamic told me that in the United States, the civil contract protects the woman. But he did not go into detail. Can someone please explain the difference in the two contracts, and in what way the contract protects the woman?
POSTED 10/25/2004
Maria T., Jacksonville, FL, United States, 60, Female, Christian, White/Caucasian, Straight, sales, 4 Years of College, Middle class, Mesg ID 1019200484822

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Question:

  I have a sort of tightening of my nerves that was the result of cerebral hypoxia, very similar to CP. It isn't noticable except for a slight trembling of my hands caused by my nerves tightening. This happens in social situations. For example, I can't pick up a martini glass or any glass without spilling it, or carry trays, etc. My hands just nervously tremble. I'm a very attractive girl who even looks younger than 27. But I have always felt embarrassed about my situation and have not dated. Could someone tell me how to overcome this? I live so close to Manhattan and can't even bring myself to go out and meet people. I'm afraid I may spill something or whatever. How will I meet a nice guy?
POSTED 10/25/2004
Anna, Staten Island, NY, United States, 27, Female, Orthodox Christian, White/Caucasian, Straight, Entrepreneur, 4 Years of College, Middle class, Mesg ID 1021200441031

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Question:

Why are black males so fixated on girls' butts?
POSTED 10/25/2004
Briana G., Iowa City, IA, United States, Female, Mesg ID 1025200420213

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Question:

Why don't teens cherish their virginity anymore? Why would you want to lose it so fast, and to someone you're guaranteed not to be with 20 years from now? I'm 17 and cherish my virginity very much, and plan to save it until my wedding day. Doesn't anyone care about this anymore?
POSTED 10/24/2004
Anna, Memphis, TN, United States, <ghsvolleygirl@hotmail.com>, 17, Female, Christian, White/Caucasian, Straight, student, Less than High School Diploma, Upper middle class, Mesg ID 10232004103742

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Question:

We recently acquired a deaf cat and he cries all the time, even louder when frustrated. It made me wonder if deaf people scream, too, when they are frustrated.
POSTED 10/24/2004
Ezzie, Pittsburgh, PA, United States, 52, Female, Atheist, White/Caucasian, Lesbian, Instructor, 4 Years of College, Middle class, Mesg ID 1023200485211

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Question:

Why don't many women seem to mind being touched by a gay man in ways that would get a straight man slapped?
POSTED 10/3/2004
Steve M., Chattanooga, TN, United States, 42, Male, White/Caucasian, Straight, contractor, Over 4 Years of College, Middle class, Mesg ID 1032004104650


Responses:

I am a 40-year-old woman and have had male friends, straight and gay, throughout my life. The reason I believe women don't mind the fondling from gay men is that it is nonconfrontational, and a way to feel attractive without feeling pressure to 'put out'. Gay men, generally, are very attentive and affectionate, and women love that. It is so refreshing to have an honest male point of view about things that straight men don't normally show an interest in, such as fashion and decorating. The openness of such a relationship is quite extraordinary and can be very intense and loving, with none of the usual anxieties that go along with being with men (we can ask "Do I look fat?" or "Am I sounding stupid?"). Gay men tend to be very understanding, sweet, fun and the best friends women could have. The physical aspect comes quite naturally and feels good.
POSTED 10/10/2004
Dawn, New Britain, CT, United States, 40, Female, Catholic, White/Caucasian, Straight, Fibromyalgia/PTSD, Disabled, High School Diploma, Upper middle class, Mesg ID 106200490333



I think it's because women realize the men are not deriving any sexual gratification or getting aroused by the contact. Plus, women in general want to feel attractive, and attention from a gay man helps that, with the added bonus of not wondering what the guy's motives are.
POSTED 10/10/2004
JJ, San Diego, CA, United States, 30, Female, Lesbian, Middle class, Mesg ID 107200444426

Because they know that the men are gay, so the touching isn't really sexually motivated.
POSTED 10/10/2004
Kari, Puy, WA, United States, 16, Female, Native American, American Indian, Straight, student, Less than High School Diploma, Lower class, Mesg ID 107200450127

It's not threatening to be touched like that by a gay man because you know he's not getting aroused.
POSTED 10/10/2004
Kristina, Washington, DC, United States, 23, Female, Black/African American, Straight, Word Processor, 2 Years of College, Middle class, Mesg ID 109200494214

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Question:

Why do black people tend to potty-train their children very early, and white people tend to train them very late?
POSTED 10/3/2004
Lynn, Memphis, TN, United States, Female, Mesg ID 103200494904


Responses:

Black people feel you should not be at the age where you are able to walk, talk and play, yet cannot take the time to determine when you need to use the lavatory. Another reason is that boys, by age 3-4, and girls, by age 2-3, are too old to be peeing on themselves. Besides, what's the use of buying diapers when your child shouldn't be still in them, anyway? It's a waste of money and time.
POSTED 10/10/2004
Nyla, Willingboro, NJ, United States, <Chic_Naliana@yahoo.com>, 17, Female, Christian, Black/African American, Straight, student, High School Diploma, Middle class, Mesg ID 1072004113817

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Question:

I can understand anyone who wants to improve the quality of his or her life by moving from a 'ghetto' to a nicer neighborhood. What I don't get is why, instead of raising the level of their lifestyle to their new surroundings, they instead bring their 'ghetto' lifestyle with them and begin to bring their new neighborhoods down to that level. They live more than one family to a housing unit, bring wrecked cars to their yards, fail to maintain their property, and act and dress in the same manner they did in the 'ghetto'. One example is the common practice of minority youths who walk in the road in front of traffic, disregarding motorists or deliberately challenging them to do something about it. Why do they do these things?
POSTED 10/25/2004
J. Michaels, W. Hartford, CT, United States, 55, Male, White/Caucasian, 2 Years of College, Middle class, Mesg ID 10182004114840

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Question:

Why do certain religions feel the need to do door to door 'recruiting' or teaching? And why, when you tell them you aren't interested in their information, do they insist on continuing?
POSTED 10/3/2004
Leann, Crown Point, IN, United States, 27, Female, Agnostic, White/Caucasian, Straight, Technical School, Lower middle class, Mesg ID 9282004101231


Responses:

Many Christian faiths compel their members to “witness” to non-believers in an attempt to convert them. Those religions that have historically been seen as “evangelical” have often put a higher value on recruiting new members than on actually following the ethical philosophy put forth by Jesus of Nazareth. These people have “dumbed” down the idea of “witnessing” by viewing it as strictly a verbal, persuasive activity or marketing exercise. In truth, witnessing should consist of simply living out the principles put forth by Christ, or as the Christian philosopher Valentinus put it: 'Speak truth to those who seek it, And speak of understanding to those who have erred. Strengthen the feet of those who stumble; Extend your hands to those who are sick; Feed those who are hungry; Give rest to those who are weary; And raise up those who wish to rise.' A true Christian converts others by just acts, not by relentless browbeating. Of course, yelling at someone is easier than acting justly. It is far easier to worship Jesus’ name than to follow his example.
POSTED 10/10/2004
Anthony U., Bluefield, WV, United States, 32, Male, Unitarian, White/Caucasian, Straight, University Administrator, Over 4 Years of College, Middle class, Mesg ID 1052004101436



They are commanded to proselytize, and they feel they are doing God's work, which is more important than your or my privacy. I just tell them I'm an atheist, wish them well and close the door. It works. Just don't waste time arguing with true believers.
POSTED 10/10/2004
Vail, Philadelphia, PA, United States, <vailbass@yahoo.com>, 40, Male, Atheist, racial mutt, Straight, 2 Years of College, Lower middle class, Mesg ID 109200481413

Growing up in an evangelical church, I heard this analogy: What if you had the cure for all diseases? You knew how to cure AIDS, cancer and everything else. You knew how to end suffering. Would you share it with others or keep it to yourself? Some people of faith believe their faith needs to be shared. They see their own lives as better. They are blessed and happy and at peace. They have left behind their old problems and embraced a better life. They want to share, and they feel that keeping this to themselves is cruel. And so, with the best intentions, they refuse to leave people alone about it. They see it in the same light as having an intervention for a friend in trouble. If you truly cared about a person, you would help them, even if they kept rejecting you. Be it alcohol, drugs or lack of faith. And not wanting anyone to go to Hell is also a concern. Again, if you were truly caring, would you want anyone to go to Hell? But that's the ideal motivation. There are other, less-ideal motivations: 1) Some faiths teach that if you don't go door-to-door, you yourself go to Hell. So these folks are doing it for themselves, not necessarily you. 2) Some people are determined to evangelize because they are actually insecure about their faith; thus, they go door-to-door in an effort to persuade themselves. 3) Some people have a martyr complex and thrive off the rejection. 4) Some people can't stand the thought of people living differently than they, and are out to change that. There are many reasons. In the end, people are silly creatures, and that explains many of life's questions.
POSTED 10/24/2004
Charles F., Houston, TX, United States, Male, Christian, White/Caucasian, Over 4 Years of College, Mesg ID 1017200444501

The reason most people give for preaching door to door is that they believe that what they have to say is important for everyone's life. I'm an Evangelical Christian, so I've done this before. To us it's kind of like being a decent neighbor and spreading the word through the community when a hurricane is announced, helping people get ready for it. The reason we insist even when people say they're not interested is that to us this is a matter of life and death.
POSTED 10/24/2004
Justin, Philadelphia, PA, United States, Male, Christian, College Student, 2 Years of College, Lower class, Mesg ID 1022200492003

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Question:
 
Why do lower-class people who drop out of school and say 'there's no brains in my family' think that education is not for them? Everybody has a talent, so why do they assume they have no brains just because they are poor?
POSTED 10/3/2004
Eoin M., Bridgeport, CT, United States, 20, Male, Atheist, White/Caucasian, Straight, student, 4 Years of College, Middle class, Mesg ID 102200482349


Responses:

I work in higher education and have for the past four years done admissions work at a private liberal arts institution. Education is more that brains. In many ways it assumes a skill set of navigating through a specific type of bureaucracy. I think less than 30 percent of the country has a four-year degree. The culture of higher education is intimidating. In some cases, attending college may create more fear of separation from the culture they know best with a majority who have not gone to college and fear what may happen if you do.
POSTED 10/10/2004
Seth G., Yellow Springs, OH, United States, 33, Male, Jewish, White/Caucasian, Enrollment Services, Over 4 Years of College, Middle class, Mesg ID 1052004112347



Actually, you have the matter the wrong way around. They are poor because they think they have no brains and drop out of school. There are several reasons they think this way. They live in a tradition, almost a culture, of people who don't finish school. Because of that, someone in this situation who wants more education must contend with their families and peers considering them 'uppity' and perhaps actively discouraging them from more schooling. Also, they are probably not being mentored properly; nobody is bothering to say 'you can be different, you can show you're smart enough to break out of the mold, you can be whatever you want to be.' They probably never heard of financial aid, either; the idea that you don't need money to go on with schooling is completely foreign to them.
POSTED 10/10/2004
Linda, Small town upstate, NY, United States, 62, Female, White/Caucasian, Computer Engineer, Over 4 Years of College, Middle class, Mesg ID 108200440312

By the time lower-class kids reach high school, many have been told (verbally, through body language, actions of abandonment, etc.) that they are not smart. Basic affirmations that build self-esteem as a young child were non-existent or weren't reinforced with examples. Often the parents don't have the time or knowledge to read to their kids a lot, help with homework, take parenting classes, etc. All of these things help parents break the cycle and show kids the importance of education.
POSTED 10/10/2004
Anne, Cedar Falls, IA, United States, 21, Female, White/Caucasian, Student, 4 Years of College, Middle class, Mesg ID 1092004124116

Though modern sociological thought calls it blaming the victim, there is a 'culture of poverty' involving modes of thinking and behavior that help keep poor people poor. An analogy might be the person who does poorly in math claiming he's just not good at it when all he really needs is to buckle down and do it. For him it's an easy out.
POSTED 10/10/2004
Vail, Philadelphia, PA, United States, <vailbass@yahoo.com>, 40, Male, Atheist, racial mutt, Straight, 2 Years of College, Lower middle class, Mesg ID 109200474618

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Question:

It seems that in America, black people are crazy about Chinese food. I live in France and this is not the case, and my British friends say they have never noticed it. What are the cultural reasons (if any) behind this affinity for Chinese food?
POSTED 10/3/2004
Tom I., Paris, NA, France, 34, Male, White/Caucasian, Straight, professor, Over 4 Years of College, Mesg ID 9282004115736


Responses:

I wouldn't say all black folks are crazy about Chinese food, but Asian restaurants, especially Chinese take-out places, have always been plentiful in working-class and low-income black neighborhoods (it's economical for a business to open in lower-income neighborhoods because the rent is cheaper). Because of that, many black Americans have been exposed to Chinese food. The food is relatively inexpensive, not to mention rather tasty.
POSTED 10/10/2004
KD, Virginia Beach, VA, United States, 20s, Female, Christian, Black/African American, Straight, 4 Years of College, Lower middle class, Mesg ID 105200482135



I am black and like Chinese food, but I am part Asian. None of my black friends like Chinese food very much (they tolerate it for my sake every so often), but for the most part, I don't know any black people - except those who are mixed with Asian - who love Chinese food the way you are saying. What do you base this weird assumption on?
POSTED 10/10/2004
Sharon, Clinton Township, MI, United States, Female, Baptist, Black/African American, Straight, Upper middle class, Mesg ID 1062004121135
No Responses

It's been my experience that every country has its own version of high-quality convenience food. In America it's Chinese, in France it's Vietnamese, in England it's Indian, and in the Netherlands it's Indonesian. I theorize this is because this is where each country had its colonies (America just imported its colonies) and took the locals as servants. When the servants had children, the only jobs they could get were as cooks. Because they could not get jobs as 'respectable chefs,' regardless of the quality of the food, the cuisine became fast food and developed (unfairly) low-class associations. I find this very regrettable, especially as each of these cultures has absolutely amazing food that sadly cannot be properly experienced in some countries.
POSTED 10/10/2004
Alex, Beloit, WI, United States, 21, Male, Jewish, White/Caucasian, Writer, 2 Years of College, Upper class, Mesg ID 107200430232

I believe it is not really the Chinese food that black people like but the combination of all-you-can-eat buffets and the fact that one doesn't feel the need to tip well, because it's usually just drinks being refilled by the waitstaff. The black culture seems to have a well-known aversion to tipping.
POSTED 10/10/2004
Shane, Memphis, TN, United States, 28, Female, Secular Humanist, White/Caucasian, Straight, Over 4 Years of College, Middle class, Mesg ID 107200473454

Black people are rich in taste for great-tasting things ... and Chinese food is just good as hell!
POSTED 10/10/2004
Nyla, Willingboro, NJ, United States, <Chic_Naliana@yahoo.com>, 17, Female, Christian, Black/African American, Straight, student, High School Diploma, Middle class, Mesg ID 1082004120221

I'm a white American who loves Chinese food (Japanese, too). Over the years, I have been to many Asian restaurants, yet I don't recall having ever seen many black people in any of them. In fact, I've noticed very few. I'm curious about where you got this notion. I think I will have to start making an effort to take a (discreet) look at other restaurant patrons. Perhaps I will come back here and let you know what I learn.
POSTED 10/10/2004
Marie, Louisville, KY, United States, 35, Female, White/Caucasian, self-employed, High School Diploma, Upper middle class, Mesg ID 1082004112046

Most people in America love Chinese cuisine. I haven't noticed a preponderance of black people in any Chinese restaurant I have ever visited. Maybe Europeans don't appreciate Chinese cuisine as much as Americans, but you can be sure that Caucasian Americans enjoy Chinese cuisine at approximately the same level that African Americans do.
POSTED 10/24/2004
John, Detroit, MI, United States, 39, Male, Catholic, White/Caucasian, Straight, 2 Years of College, Lower class, Mesg ID 1012200422214

I am black and have never noticed any unusually high affinity for Chinese food among the black people I've known. If I can speculate, though, I would note that many Chinese dishes use rice, which is very common in black culture. Certain specific Chinese dishes use vegetables, fried meat and/or sauces, which are also common in black culture.
POSTED 10/24/2004
Mike W., Houston, TX, United States, Male, Black/African American, Over 4 Years of College, Mesg ID 1012200470134

There isn't a cultural reason. Chinese food tastes good to lots of folks (I see many Hispanics whenever I go to a Chinese restaurant).
POSTED 10/24/2004
E.D., Kansas City, MO, United States, 48, Female, Black/African American, Mesg ID 1021200491342

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Question:

Why do so many old people drive Buicks? I just don't get it. There are lots more luxurious cars if that's what they like, but it's always Buicks. What's up with that?
POSTED 10/3/2004
Hermione, Birmingham, AL, United States, 34, Female, Agnostic, White/Caucasian, Straight, IT, Over 4 Years of College, Middle class, Mesg ID 929200435325


Responses:

My dad has driven Buicks for many years. He always buys high-end older Buicks, even though he has enough money to buy a brand new one. His cars always ride like you are floating on air. I remember when I was a kid, every car we had would have a rattle or squeak somewhere under the dash board. It drove my dad crazy. He says none of his Buicks ever rattle or squeak like that. A few years ago, he told his wife that he always wanted a Caddy. So they went and traded in his Buick. Within a week, they had returned the Caddy and brought home the same Buick!
POSTED 10/10/2004
Christie, Southern Illinois, IL, United States, 37, Female, Straight, depression, anxiety, Lower middle class, Mesg ID 104200483907



There are a few reasons older people still believe in driving an American car, and Buicks are second in line to Lexus in reliability. Buicks are also inexpensive compared to other autos.
POSTED 10/10/2004
Gerald, Sacramento, CA, United States, 42, Male, Christian, Black/African American, Straight, 4 Years of College, Middle class, Mesg ID 107200453358

Most people over 60 (especially men) don't want to stand out in a crowd (notice the men over 60 who exclusively wear Earth-tone polyester clothing), and most Buicks from the '80s until recently have very non-descript styling. Also, as people age in this country, they tend to get overweight, have health issues and limited physical mobility, and Buicks don't sit too low or too high and are mid- to large-size cars with large doors and bench seats, which make the car easy for someone with limited flexibility to get in and out of. Imagine your grandparents trying to get in and out of a Corvette! Also, Baby Boomers and the World War II generation are the last Americans to be brand loyal. For people over 50, Buick has been a status symbol of quality and luxury throughout their lifetime. Not only that, but Buick Park Avenues are one of the most luxurious cars in the world, even if American cars don't carry as much 'look at me' factor as foreign makes. Finally, there's the cost. The average Buick is $25k, while the average Benz or Lexus is $40k. Why pay $20k more when you are not getting $20k more? Keep in mind that aging Baby Boomers don't care about looking like a 'Gangsta Rapper' with 'Bling Bling' or 'glossing'.
POSTED 10/10/2004
CR, Pontiac, MI, United States, 34, Upper middle class, Mesg ID 107200455331

I'm in a strange minority: I'm 28, drive a great, big Buick and love it. My friends rip on me for driving a 'Grampa Car,' but it's the only ride I'd want. I'm a long and tall guy (6'3' with wide shoulders and long limbs) so the big American cars fit me right, and I always like to buy American. Buicks are built for comfort and power, not quickness and flash, so they're great for a nice drive in the country. Also, Buicks are just as good as Cadillacs and Lincolns, but are much more modest. Buicks are Old School.
POSTED 10/10/2004
Teague, Portland, OR, United States, 28, Male, Christian, White/Caucasian, Straight, Over 4 Years of College, Upper class, Mesg ID 108200435257

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Question:

I just started work with a company, and although I graduated with honors from high school and college, I was presumed stupid and in need of remedial training by just about everyone in the office. My company also just hired a Caucasian guy. He receives all the attention and training, though our backgrounds are similiar and I may even have an edge on him. I find that my work is very remedial - almost secretarial - and my supervisor treats me as if I'm an idiot. I feel as if I am the butt of office cruelty. My family always taught me if I worked hard and became educated, everything would work out. But they failed to prepare me for this horror. I could leave, but what example would I be setting? Martin Luther King Jr. didn't give up when the going got tough, and neither did all the others who gave up their lives and comfort so I could sit here and complain. I am pursuing a double MBA and I'm wondering if it will pay off. Any comments would be helpful.
POSTED 10/3/2004
Honey, Chicago, IL, United States, <honeyis5268@yahoo.com>, 23, Female, Black/African American, Straight, Over 4 Years of College, Middle class, Mesg ID 929200455934


Responses:

First, if you really think people are treating you with disdain or discriminating against you, I suggest you document everything. Each time your supervisor says something you think is condescending, each time you see the white guy being treated 'better' or with favoritism, etc., make a record of it. But be very careful that you aren't seeing things that aren't there. What makes you think you have an edge over the man they hired? You're only 23; does he have more experience or education? Just make sure you're not making mountains out of molehills, or no one will take you seriously when you do file a grievance or make a formal complaint. Second, as a secretary, I resent the implication that secretarial work is menial or 'remedial,' as though what I do isn't as important as what my boss does simply because I don't rank right up there with him in the firm's hierarchy. You need to learn to see each job in the company as part of the whole picture, and each person's contribution as equally important to promoting what the company's goal is. Once you get your mind around the fact that the cleaning lady is a person whose contribution is needed as much as that of the CEO, you'll be well on your way to receiving the respect you think you deserve. Try to observe how everyone is treated - and how you treat everyone around you.
POSTED 10/10/2004
Melody, Kansas City, MO, United States, 40, Female, Christian, White/Caucasian, 4 Years of College, Mesg ID 105200440343



Do not let anything or anyone stop you from getting your education. Hold on to this job until you get your degrees. Their opinion of you is not important; they are not your family or friends.
POSTED 10/10/2004
Ebony, Princeton, NJ, United States, 39, Female, Mesg ID 106200494354

I'd have thought that would be better by now - I experienced it in the '60s. In a computer programming class in 1963, at an IBM facility, some of the whites thought a black person couldn't program computers until I aced the class and outperformed them. I had to excel to prove myself, and maybe so do you now. How else do you think you will get ahead? Go Sister.
POSTED 10/10/2004
James W., Raleigh, NC, United States, 66, Male, Baptist, Black/African American, Straight, retired computer consultant, Technical School, Upper middle class, Mesg ID 10102004120633

I don't need to tell you that racism is still alive and well in America. Not as pervasive as in years past, but it exists. The good news is that there are employers who are more business-minded (racism is really not good for business, and some in the business community have realized that it is good for their bottom line to hire and promote qualified people of all races). You can 'stand and fight' or discretely seek out another employer. If you have the academic qualifications that you say you have and you now have actual work experience, you should be able to do better with another company. Perhaps a competitor of your current employer? I have seen it happen.
POSTED 10/10/2004
Ramonna, Minneapolis, MN, United States, 50, Female, Episcopalian, Black/African American, Straight, attorney, Over 4 Years of College, Upper middle class, Mesg ID 1010200451010

I take a class in school titled 'Diversity in the Workplace,' and in the few weeks I have been attending, I have concluded that nobody can make me feel inferior without my consent. The fact that I'm Nigerian, a female and am dark-skinned doesn't mean anyone should make me feel belittled. Sure, Martin Luther King Jr. fought the battle, but racial profiling still exists. It is now left for y'all to pick up from where he stopped. Not through violence, but through not giving up and knowing that no matter how long it takes, your hard work will pay off. You have to show that you are smart, and since you've got age on your side, why worry? Though the 'glass ceiling' issue is there, you don't have to let that stop you from getting to the top. Others have done it, so why not you? If one person can make it, you don't have to think of the 50 others who have failed. Double MBA? You go girl!
POSTED 10/10/2004
Dorcas, Apata, MD, United States, 21, Female, Christian, Black/African American, Straight, 2 Years of College, Mesg ID 1010200464140

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Question:

My friends and I are always curious about what kind of Asian girls foreigners think are beautiful. Can someone give me specific characteristics, no matter outer or inner qualities?
POSTED 10/3/2004
Ying-Yao, Miami, FL, United States, 24, Female, Asian, Straight, student, Over 4 Years of College, Middle class, Mesg ID 929200462313


Responses:
If based on physical appearance, I'd say it's just the 'exotic' aspect of them to the Western imagination. We have a long history of imagining the 'inscrutable' and mysterious Asian, however mistaken that may be. Beyond physical appearance, I'd look for the same qualities in any woman. I know that's not quite what you asked, but I think it's important.
POSTED 10/10/2004
Vail, Philadelphia, PA, United States, <vailbass@yahoo.com>, 40, Male, Atheist, racial mutt, Straight, 2 Years of College, Lower middle class, Mesg ID 109200480443

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Question:

Why do people's voices change as they age beyond 70?
POSTED 10/3/2004
Terry R., Phoenix, AZ, United States, 55, Male, New Age/Metaphysical, White/Caucasian, Straight, Sales, 4 Years of College, Middle class, Mesg ID 929200481817


Responses:
The answer is quite simple. When people get older their bodies get weaker. The muscles that are in control of voice production get weaker and the voice is somewhat straining. So it's a little unstable and beginning to crack down.
POSTED 10/24/2004
Anna, Memphis, TN, United States, <ghsvolleygirl@hotmail.com>, 17, Female, Christian, White/Caucasian, Straight, student, Less than High School Diploma, Upper middle class, Mesg ID 10232004100549

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